Sick of Hearing About Star Wars Then Here’s the Cure

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Here’s a secret. While I played a lot of Dungeons and Dragons as a kid, I’m not a big fantasy fan. But I still love the Lego Knights stuff. And about an hour from Dallas there’s a huge renaissance fair that goes on for the spring and summer. I have a couple of friends who participate. We also have a Medieval Times (we don’t have forks, would like another Pepsi - the only funny bit in an old movie “The Cable Guy”). And who doesn’t love seeing people jousting on horses in real life? But I do love Star Wars which is kind of like knights. And let’s face it we love to play sword fighting with our Lego. Actually when I explained my story ideas for my LEGO films - Nathan understood I wasn’t making kid films.

What’s great about LEGO knights is that you can bring ancient stories back to life such as King Arthur. Or other fairy tales. But what’s important is that it broadens the stories I can tell with LEGO. Knights come and go in popularity. I’m pretty sure the studios wanted to launch a King Arthur franchise around that movie. Unfortunately it flopped harder than the time someone presented a vegetarian menu at Mark’s birthday party. Note - Mark doesn’t eat vegetables. But I don’t think that knight tales will ever go away. There’s always a demand for fantasy stories. Even more than the historically accurate tales. And it’s great that LEGO continues to support these dreams. And if LEGO launches it then there is likely going to be demand. And they will last. And a collector’s market.

I remember the medieval sets being the earliest forms of play with LEGO. And it continues to inspire the next generation of children. And will likely carry on to future generations. You don’t completely outsource all of your imagination. You still have to provide the stories and sounds. I get pretty silly with my LEGO. I constantly am coming up with sounds and stories. And thinking way beyond what you might think of with your LEGO sets. I am spending a lot of time learning about how to setup my studio and figure out animating my LEGO dudes. I very much enjoy the fact I’m not limited to just the sounds from the product. Though I’m not sure how I’m going to voice the parts yet. I’m leaning more towards just starting off with subtitles. But in general there’s no limit to who can play with LEGO Whether you are old or young. No matter what race or creed or color. Anyone can have fun with LEGO.

And LEGO provides us the ability to recreate history as well the future. If you get your kids into playing with historical sets then you can share lessons with them. And they can become more curious. I’d rather have curious kids than those who just boring memorize facts. History is a “story” not mere facts. It’s more fun to know the stories than the facts. Things like - did you know FDR rode around in Al Capone’s captured car after the start of WW2 because it was the only armored limo in the US government possession on December 7, 1941. And I love that my nieces play with toys that encourage creativity not just play pre-built games. Can you use LEGO to help get your children more interested in a topic? If not medieval history - how about space exploration through the NASA sets or even Star Wars? I can’t wait to see what else LEGO gives us.

Here’s a secret. While I played a lot of Dungeons and Dragons as a kid, I’m not a big fantasy fan. But I still love the Lego Knights stuff. And about an hour from Dallas there’s a huge renaissance fair that goes on for the spring and summer. I have a couple of friends who participate. We also have a Medieval Times (we don’t have forks, would like another Pepsi - the only funny bit in an old movie “The Cable Guy”). And who doesn’t love seeing people jousting on horses in real life? But I do love Star Wars which is kind of like knights. And let’s face it we love to play sword fighting with our Lego. Actually when I explained my story ideas for my LEGO films - Nathan understood I wasn’t making kid films.

What’s great about LEGO knights is that you can bring ancient stories back to life such as King Arthur. Or other fairy tales. But what’s important is that it broadens the stories I can tell with LEGO. Knights come and go in popularity. I’m pretty sure the studios wanted to launch a King Arthur franchise around that movie. Unfortunately it flopped harder than the time someone presented a vegetarian menu at Mark’s birthday party. Note - Mark doesn’t eat vegetables. But I don’t think that knight tales will ever go away. There’s always a demand for fantasy stories. Even more than the historically accurate tales. And it’s great that LEGO continues to support these dreams. And if LEGO launches it then there is likely going to be demand. And they will last. And a collector’s market.

I remember the medieval sets being the earliest forms of play with LEGO. And it continues to inspire the next generation of children. And will likely carry on to future generations. You don’t completely outsource all of your imagination. You still have to provide the stories and sounds. I get pretty silly with my LEGO. I constantly am coming up with sounds and stories. And thinking way beyond what you might think of with your LEGO sets. I am spending a lot of time learning about how to setup my studio and figure out animating my LEGO dudes. I very much enjoy the fact I’m not limited to just the sounds from the product. Though I’m not sure how I’m going to voice the parts yet. I’m leaning more towards just starting off with subtitles. But in general there’s no limit to who can play with LEGO Whether you are old or young. No matter what race or creed or color. Anyone can have fun with LEGO.

And LEGO provides us the ability to recreate history as well the future. If you get your kids into playing with historical sets then you can share lessons with them. And they can become more curious. I’d rather have curious kids than those who just boring memorize facts. History is a “story” not mere facts. It’s more fun to know the stories than the facts. Things like - did you know FDR rode around in Al Capone’s captured car after the start of WW2 because it was the only armored limo in the US government possession on December 7, 1941. And I love that my nieces play with toys that encourage creativity not just play pre-built games. Can you use LEGO to help get your children more interested in a topic? If not medieval history - how about space exploration through the NASA sets or even Star Wars? I can’t wait to see what else LEGO gives us.

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